Speakers at ICG-13

Speakers at ICG-13

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Biography
Dr. Wu got his PhD degree from James D. Watson Institute of Genome Sciences, Zhejiang University in 2012. He is currently working as a bioinformatician in Fredrik Backhed’s Lab where he focuses more on how to understand host-microbes interactions within the context of metabolic disorders by integrating multi-omics datasets. His work on low carbs diet- and metformin-microbiota interactions have been published in Cell Metabolism and Nature Medicine recently. 

Abstract
From multi-omics to causality: time to go for human intervention studies
Hao Wu
The Wallenberg Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
The links between human health and gut microbes have been well established but the causality and molecular mechanisms behind those links remain elusive. By multi-omics profiling in two recent human intervention studies, we found: 1) the glucose-lowering effect of orally administrated metformin is partially due to metformin-adapted microbial changes and this drug may interact with bacteria by regulating metal-chelating proteins; 2) carbohydrate-restricted diet can drive microbial shifts toward folate production which in turn explains 20-30% of liver fat reduction potentially through folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism. In a third omics study, we found that a new bacterial metabolite imidazole propionate (ImP, derived from histidine metabolism) which has higher circulating levels in individuals with T2D can directly lead to insulin resistance when injected to mice. We are now designing short-term human intervention studies trying to address whether histidine-rich protein diet can result in increased circulating ImP and whether levels of this metabolite depend on the individual settings of the gut microbiome.

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