Speakers at ICG-13

Speakers at ICG-13

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Biography

Director of GHM Institute of CNS Regeneration at Jinan University, Guangzhou, China; Chair of Anatomy in the Department of Ophthalmology and the State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Jessie Ho Professor in Neuroscience, The University of Hong Kong; (http://www.eyeinst.hku.hk/Prof_So.htm), member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, member of the Advisory Committee, Ministry of Education/ 2011 Program, member of Biolgical and Medicine Council/ Ministry of Education, member of Consultative Committee/ the national 973 Program/ major national research funding program in China (www.973.gov.cn/), Director of China Spinal Cord Injury Network (ChinaSCINet), Co-Chairman of the Board of Director of the ChinaSCINet (www.chinascinet.org), and  Editor-in-Chief of Neural Regeneration Research (www.nrronline.org). 

 

Received PhD degree from MIT. He is one of the pioneers in the field of axonal regeneration in visual system. He was the first to show lengthy regeneration of retinal ganglion cells in adult mammals with peripheral nerve graft. He is currently using multiple approaches to promote axonal regeneration in the optic nerve and spinal cord. His team identifies neuroprotective and regenerative factors including: exercise, wolfberry, trophic factors, peptide nanofiber scaffold, and environmental manipulation. 1995 obtained the Natural Science Award of the National Natural Science Foundation of China. 1999 was elected Member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. 2015 was elected US National Academy of Invention Fellow.  2017 elected a member of DABI (Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, www.dana.org). 

 

He is the author and co-author of over 420+ publications (http://scholar.google.com/citations?hl=en&user=SUPKYiQAAAAJ&view_op=list_works) ; co-inventors of 25 patents.


Abstract

Exercise training improves motor skill learning via selective activation of mTOR

Kwok Fai SO

Exercise training improves acquisition of complex motor skill, whilst the underlying neurological mechanism is unsolved. The molecular mechanism directing exercise induced motor learning enhancement, and in what perspectives does such pathway re-shape neuronal structure and activity thus need to be answered. To address this issue, we found that chronic treadmill exercise enhanced learning of motor skills by activating mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PRN) of mouse primary cortex (M1). The activation of mTORC1 leads to improved spine formation and maintenance and enhanced excitatory transmission of L5PRN after exercise. Furthermore, exercise training activated mTORC1 activation to improve oligodendrogenesis and axonal myelination. Taken together, this exercise-induced and mTOR dependent cortical neuron remodeling provides new insights for understanding exercise-enhanced learning and memory.

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