Speakers at ICG-13

Speakers at ICG-13

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Biography

Todd Dickinson has focused his professional career in the area of genomics. Dr. Dickinson is a founding scientist of Illumina, Inc, and during his 12-year tenure there held numerous technical and commercial roles of increasing responsibility. After earning undergraduate degrees in chemistry and theology from St. Olaf College, and a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry at Tufts University under the direction of Professor David Walt, Dr. Dickinson helped start Illumina in 1998 based on ideas conceived in the Walt lab. Dr. Dickinson helped establish the product development processes at Illumina and led several of the earliest project teams. He has directed programs in optical chemical detection, the design and development of the early array formats used in Illumina's industry-leading BeadArray® microarray product lines, and several major strategic programs aimed at developing future-generation sequencing platforms. Dr. Dickinson has also held several commercial management roles. As Director of Product Marketing at Illumina, his teams carried out over 60 product launches in a two-year period, and achieved triple-digit growths across several product lines.  In 2011 he joined BioNano Genomics, an early-stage genomics technology company in San Diego, to lead the commercialization of a novel nanochannel array platform.  During his tenure at BioNano, Dr. Dickinson served as Vice President of Product Development, and subsequently as Vice President of Global Commercial Operations, and led the company’s worldwide launch of its flagship product offering, the Irys™ system. Currently Dr. Dickinson is CEO of two early-stage genomics companies: Dovetail Genomics, and Arc Bio, and is a Director of the parent company EdenRoc Sciences. He serves as an Advisor to several genomics start-up companies, and is an inventor on ten patents and patent applications.


Abstract

From Tumor to Host to Microbiome:New Tools for Unraveling the Mysteries of Cancer

Todd Dickinson1,2, Ed Green1, Nik Putnam1, Marco Blanchette1, Javkhlan Ganbat1, Dan Le1, Alejandro Quiroz-Zarate2, Thomas Watson2, Ramesh Ramakrishnan1

1Dovetail Genomics, Scott’s Valley, CA; 2Arc Bio, Scott’s Valley, CA and Cambridge, MA

Within the clinical arena, the oncology community has led the way in the early adoption of next generation sequencing.  NGS is in widespread use in clinical cancer research and is now beginning to help guide clinical treatment in many hospitals and cancer centers.  There remain, however, significant challenges in using standard NGS technology alone to construct a fully detailed picture of cancer.  These challenges are compounded when attempting to glean this information from degraded archival samples such as FFPE samples.  New tools and methods are needed to discover and reliably detect critical structural rearrangements, such as fusions and translocations, particularly in challenging areas of the genome where short-read approaches stumble.  Careful analysis of topologically associated domains (TADs) and their role in cancer and other human disease is also of increasing interest, yet requires long-range genomic information to adequately capture.  In addition to understanding the role of variants and chromosomal structure in cancer, there is mounting evidence that the microbiome (both viral and bacterial) plays a pivotal role in cancer onset, progression, and response to therapies.  We will present a number of novel NGS-based technologies and workflows that can both efficiently measure and analyze these new modalities, enabling a more multi-dimensional understanding of cancer beyond just single base pair changes.

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