Speakers at ICG-13

Speakers at ICG-13

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Biography

Glimcher’s original training was as a physiologist at the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania, which he completed after obtaining a BA at Princeton in 1983. At Penn he researched both the neurobiological basis of addictive behaviors and the brainstem and mesencephalic brain areas that control eye movements. After taking a faculty position at New York University in 1994, he began to examine the neurobiological basis of human decision-making. Between 1994 and 2001 his work gradually branched out into more applied and clinical domains to incorporate the study of economics and psychology as it applied to human decision-making in health and disease. He is generally credited with founding the field of Neuroeconomics in the early 2000s. He served as the founding President of the international Society for Neuroeconomics and is senior editor standard textbook in the field.

 

In 2005 he was appointed founding director of the Center for Neuroeconomics at NYU. In 2010 he was appointed the Julius Silver Professor of Neural Science at NYU. In 2014 he was named Director of the Provostial Institute for the Study of Decision Making at NYU. In 2015 he was appointed Director of The HUMAN Project, a Big Data Phenomics project, at NYU. His current research centers on the role of phenomics in health and disease with a clear focus on how phenomics and genomics interact.

 

Glimcher is the author of: Decisions, Uncertainty and the Brain (2001, MIT Press) which is available in English, Spanish, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese. Foundations of Neuroeconomic Inquiry (2011, Oxford University Press) available in English and Chinese. Neuroeconomics: Decision Making and the Brain (2nd ed, 2012, Elsevier) available in English and Chinese. He is also the author of numerous scientific articles published in journals including Nature, Science, The Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Neuron, Nature Neuroscience, Big Data, the Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, Games and Economic Behavior, Psychological Science, and the Journal of Experimental Psychology, amongst others.


Abstract

Developing Low-Cost Deep Phenomics at Scale: Lessons From the Human Project

Complete subject-level genetic data will need to be complemented with equally detailed subject-level phenomic data. The days in which an electronic medical record was considered phenotype are rapidly passing. Recent genetics-only studies of cancer treatment, EMR/genetics studies of asthma, and genetic studies of depression have made it abundantly clear that environment and lifestyle interact with genetics to produce health. Fortunately, the rise of smartphones, low-cost Internet-of-Things devices, and administrative/corporate databases now make it possible to gather deep phenomic data at prices that rival genetic data byte-for-byte.  Data collection systems like those developed for the Human Project make it possible to gather 100’s of Gigabytes of phenotypic data per subject at costs in the $1000 range. Data ranging from geotracks, to spending profiles, to nutritional choices, to housing situations, to in-home air quality are examples of low cost, hugely important, measures. The genetic revolution of the 1990s unlocked enormous potential but the true power of genetics will be unlocked only when the phenomic revolution also comes of age.

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